Słownictwo liniowe - Example Combo 2

Zadaj pytanie na naszym forum tutaj .
Zadaj pytanie na naszym forum tutaj .
Komentarze
Muzyka
Transkrypcja
Tagi
  • Right now, we are talking about which directions you move and the freedoms you have.
  • Once you get comfortable with this, the next layer of depth is to start adding shape and timing and size to your steps so that they better fit the music.
  • We will be creating videos which talk about the size of the step and matching the interpretation of the music.
Nazwa wykonawcy:
Carlos di Sarli
Tytuł piosenki:
Adiós Te Vas
Tytuł albumu:
Classics (1940-1943)

(Paraphrased from todotango.com): He, as nobody else, knew how to combine the rhythmic cadence of tango with a harmonic structure, apparently simple, but full of nuances and subtleties.

00:04
We're going to give you now another example, and then also, I'll talk about how you can think about this choreographically.
00:11
So that, as you do this, you can say to yourself, "What would be an appropriate way for me to put this together myself?"
00:20
For example, we can say...
00:31
That wasn't a whole lot of saying. I guess you can say with your body, you can say with your body,
00:36
Forward, change weight, or, for the ladies, back, step, change weight, side... pause, back, pause, or, for the ladies, forward.
00:43
One more time we'll show you, and then, after that, do it with us.
00:57
It's really important, when we take back steps, that we stay forward to our partner when we do it.
01:04
Right
01:05
Now, when we think about this choreographically, really, that's only five elements, right?
01:09
The last combination was five elements, the intro chapter was five elements. It was:
01:14
forward, back, sidesteps, weight changes, and then just pausing.
01:19
So, those same five steps, for everything, and we're just putting them together in different ways.
01:25
And I want you to think, "Wow, that seems really simple", because it should.
01:30
But, you'd say, "Well, what makes it a good five elements to put together?"
01:34
And one thing is you want to have a sense of resolution.
01:37
And usually...
01:38
So, you could say, when you talk for a sentence, you say, "My, watch that dog fly!"
01:43
You know, something we say all the time. You know, we say this every day, "My, watch that dog fly!"
01:48
How is it you know the sentence ends?
01:50
And, there's this pause, right? There's a period, and you hear the period.
01:53
I don't say, "My watch that dog fly lamb stays right there"
01:57
Right, there's no... I would say, "My, watch that dog fly. Lamp stands right there."
02:02
And there's that comma, or that, well, in this case, period, and some silence.
02:06
And so, similarly, when we dance tango, often we'll have a pause, or a weight change as punctuation.
02:13
So, I might do some step that has sides, and forwards, and changes, and what not, but at the end,
02:18
I'll usually wait a little extra, and/or I'll have a weight change. And, in my mind, there's a sense of conclusion.
02:25
That's really good, that idea of having a little bit of a silence,
02:29
or a little bit of a waiting, is, really adds a lot of texture to the dancing.
02:33
So, for example, if you see either of these two combinations, the one we just did in this chapter,
02:38
We had: forward, change, forward, change, side, pause, back, pause... ...and then we went on
02:43
So, it had sort of that extra silence of the sentence.
02:46
Likewise, the previous combination, I don't remember it, but it had a pause; you know, it was at least five minutes ago.
02:52
Let's do it again, and then you guys can pay attention to that way in which we time it
02:57
Yes
02:58
'Cause that's what makes it... It's a good part of what makes it interesting.