Meer over Molinette - Close Embrace

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One thing that's interesting in molinette in close embrace that we don't talk about is that it seems to want to be a little faster.

In open embrace, on a forward/side, typically it can go in this long controlled way. In close embrace, because it's so much smaller, usually it becomes more staccato by stopping.

So that, if you do a quick, quick, slow, then slow becomes a stop where in open embrace that slow goes through. Not only does the distance radically change the follower's styling but it also changes the musical dynamic within the same timing.

Artiestennaam:
Carlos Libedinsky
Song Titel:
El Día Despues
Album Titel:
The Rough Guide To Tango
Kunstenaars Website:
http://www.carloslibedinsky.com/en/index.html

(From Wikipedia): Carlos Libedinsky is an Argentine musician, composer and producer. He is most renowned for his neo-tango project, Narcotango.

00:31
And so that’s doing molinette in close embrace,
which is not -
00:35
Very different animal.
00:36
Not nearly as easy as doing molinette
in open embrace.
00:39
You know, at this point everyone turns off
the video.
00:42
Yes.
00:44
For the followers, a lot of the idea is about
keeping the right distance.
00:48
So you want to stay the same distance
and we've said that over and over.
00:50
But how do you stay the same distance,
when the distance is this big.
00:54
And the answer is, if you see the styling of my feet…
01:06
..I’m cutting behind and it’s that tight, right?
So your backstep becomes this.
01:13
And that way because you don’t have that much
rotation in your hips...
01:15
..because your chest is fixed.
01:17
So you have much less rotation in your hips.
01:21
So there’s your cut.
01:22
On your side step you have more pivot
and then you step side, around.
01:27
On your front step, instead of stepping front,
it almost becomes a pivot with a cross.
01:32
N. A go nowhere ocho.
D. A go nowhere ocho. And then you pivot some more and you step side.
01:35
It’s that tight.
01:45
For the leaders, really if anything I want you to stay a little bit back weighted.
01:51
So you’re on the balls of your feet.
01:53
But if you lean at her, at all,
even in the least bit then...
01:55
..then she sort of flies off into oblivion,
taking you with her.
01:59
They’re like, “That doesn’t sound so bad.”
It is. It is. There are better ways.
02:03
So as you’re here for example, I just turn and
she’ll cut around me.
02:16
That was kind of fun.
02:19
And a lot of close embrace,
a lot of close embrace is about...
02:22
..finding the space when
there’s no space.
02:26
That's really right.
02:27
So for example if she’s here and I’m here
and you say, “There’s no space.”
02:31
But at the same time.
02:35
So he’s following now.
02:36
Right, I’m following. I’m the follower.
My right arm is up.
02:39
But I want you to imagine that right here between you...
02:42
..your body could slide past and turn for the followers,
that you create space where there’s none.
02:47
If we’re talking about a gancho
and she has her foot out…
02:50
..right here we’re still in close embrace.
But you know it barely needs to move.
02:56
So I want you to think that you can use the
rotation of your upper body somewhat…
02:59
..and especially the lower body a lot
to make things work.
03:04
And that’s very obvious in this step.
Let me follow once, so I’m the follower.
03:08
Oh boy.
03:18
Told you that was the only way I knew
how to lead this.
03:20
That works. It works.